Tag Archives: husbandry training

Weekly Woof from the Web

So many awesome woofs from around the web, let’s get started!

Lots of interesting pointers here to help tell if our dog has a muscle injury.

Just like humans, visual acuity in dogs declines with age but dogs are more likely to become nearsighted, according to a recently published report. This may account for changes in responsiveness and other behavioural responses. Summary of this work here.

Some excellent tips: Creating a canine travel emergency kit 

We all want our dogs to be happy so here are 10 things to avoid as many dog don’t like them, and here are 16 things you should stop doing in order to be happy with your dog because your happiness is important too; enjoy your dog and be happy together!

Talk about keeping ’em happy…here are 19 easy dog treat recipes!

You know your pet best and if you suspect that they are a little off, it’s a good idea to have a chat with the vet. Here are 5 surprising signs your pet might need to see a vet.

And to keep that vet visit and treatment as stress-reduced as possible this post offers a wealth of resources on doing just that: Less stress at the vets for dogs and cats

A nice straight forward piece here, Are Muzzles Cruel?…let me give you a hint…NO!

Some pets are just super helpful…

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They will always be your best friend… (tissues needed)

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And here’s what it would look like if donkeys had Skype…

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Congratulations to Lucca, an explosives detection dog, receives the Dickin Award, after serving with the US Marine Corps in Iraq and Afghanistan and losing a leg – go Lucca!

Weekly Woof from the Web

There’s always time for another Woof!

Reward based training isn’t about pushing-cookies, it’s about applying what we know about how dogs learn to teach dogs in an effective and efficient manner (works for all learning species too!): The truth about positive reinforcement

Never presume that a change in your dog’s health or behaviour is ‘just age’ – have a chat with your vet, even if it is a normal part of aging, there may be excellent treatments available that can greatly improve your dog’s quality of life, including with arthritis: So your dog has arthritis

Know someone who has kids and dogs, or is soon to have dogs and kids? Send them this: Pregnancy, Pups & Preparation

Not a dog but these same strategies can be adapted to arrange the training environment so that husbandry procedures, like nail clipping, can be stress free: Restraint-free nail clipping for  Allen, a Bearded Dragon

Although manners training (e.g. loose leash walking, recall, stay etc.) is a great start and very helpful, some dogs and some behaviours need more help, and generally regular training classes won’t be the way to help them: “Needs Training”

This is a thought provoking piece – neglecting to look after a dog’s behavioural, training, social and environmental needs can and does certainly impact its welfare: Poor Little Rich Dog

More on University of Lincoln’s work looking at our dogs’ pretty amazing capacity for appreciating human (and canine) emotion: Dogs can read human emotions

(Warning: tissues may be required) What we do for them at the end, says a lot about how we loved and lived with them: The Last Meal I Gave My Dog

We love the ScienceDog blog; here’s a great covering of some work on dog-dog social learning: Doggie See, Doggie Do?

Here are some great tips of introducing a dog to a cat

But sometimes it’s not a match made in heaven: Cats stealing dogs’ beds

More very smart, stealthy, and sneaky animals stealing food!

And perhaps the stealthiest of them all: An A-door-able Thief!

Weekly Woof from the Web

A busy week so a packed round-up for you:

Older dogs with grey muzzles are heart-melters and we of course want to make sure that their twilight years are the best.
Some great advice on keeping the senior canine family member happy and healthy, especially when there is a young upstart under the same roof from Smart Dog University.

On the subject of seniors, making decisions about their treatment Vs their quality of life is always difficult; here Marc Bekoff examines What’s a good life for an old dog?

Helping bonded dogs cope with the loss of a canine companion can be very tough; here’s one take.
And not just difficult for canine companions, but also the other end of the leash too. Has grief for a dog who died every overwhelmed you? Don’t worry, you are not alone.

Training your dog is vital, not a luxury. You really need ten reasons? 10 Reasons to train your dog and 10 Top Tips from Dr Yin!

Trick training is not only fun but behaviours taught can be useful in sports, conditioning and working with your dog plus you develop an excellent relationship with them, all the while having a great time. Lexus and Jesse provide lots of inspiration!

Even when you might enjoy the scents of aromatherapy, there can be harmful effects for our pets: Aromatherapy: Relaxation or Torment for Pets?

Finding a good dentist can be tricky, and so can finding a good dog trainer – don’t worry always ask us for help in choosing a pet care professional!

Animals are naturally stoic and don’t want to be too obvious about showing serious pain. Pain is a major stressor leading to often misunderstood, subtle and even surprising behavioural changes – that’s why if there’s a change in behaviour or behaviour issues present, the first port of call is the vet!
Your dog can’t be in pain as he runs & plays? Think again!

Veterinary medicine really has come such a long way but important considerations are always required when it comes to pet anaesthesia: Canine Anesthesia
Being an informed pet owner also means knowing what questions to ask too: Questions to ask before anesthesia

I know we all love a hug, and love cuddling a cute canine even more, but for some dogs in some situations, this might not be as much of a joy for them: Why dogs don’t like to be hugged and Does your dog like cuddles?
Just as we would prefer to be asked before being touched, ask does your dog really want to be petted?

Philip Tedeschi delivers an insightful TEDx talk on the human-animal bond.

Be more dog: How to be a dog

Did you know that we can teach all manner of animals to be willing participants in their healthcare, even for invasive procedures? This originates in work with large, exotic animals in zoos and collections – it’s pretty tricky to restrain a large cat or hyena and sedation is stressful and dangerous. So, why do we continue to restrain dogs and other pet animals, causing untold levels of distress (to all) and presenting potential health and safety nightmares; instead try husbandry training like this fantastic example.

A streaker!

Squishy and stretchy; dogs squeeeeeeezing through cat-doors!

And my favourite clip this week; it’s always the little ones!

So many great bits and pieces, we might even have enough for another WWW this week!